Heroic Imperialists In Africa Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Heroic Imperialists in Africa
Author: Berny Sèbe
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0719097517
Pages: 352
Year: 2015-01-04
View: 1254
Read: 828
From the height of ‘New Imperialism’ until the Second World War, three generations of heroes of the British and French empires in Africa were selected, manufactured and packaged for consumption by a metropolitan public eager to discover new horizons and to find comfort in the concept of a ‘civilising mission’. Available in paperback for the first time, this book looks at imperial heroism by examining the legends of a dozen major colonial figures on both sides of the Channel, revisiting the familiar stories of Livingstone, Gordon and Kitchener from a radically new angle, and throwing light on their French counterparts, often less famous in the Anglophone world but certainly equally fascinating.
King Leopold's Ghost
Author: Adam Hochschild
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547525737
Pages: 400
Year: 1999-09-03
View: 696
Read: 1030
In the 1880s, as the European powers were carving up Africa, King Leopold II of Belgium seized for himself the vast and mostly unexplored territory surrounding the Congo River. Carrying out a genocidal plundering of the Congo, he looted its rubber, brutalized its people, and ultimately slashed its population by ten million—all the while shrewdly cultivating his reputation as a great humanitarian. Heroic efforts to expose these crimes eventually led to the first great human rights movement of the twentieth century, in which everyone from Mark Twain to the Archbishop of Canterbury participated. King Leopold's Ghost is the haunting account of a megalomaniac of monstrous proportions, a man as cunning, charming, and cruel as any of the great Shakespearean villains. It is also the deeply moving portrait of those who fought Leopold: a brave handful of missionaries, travelers, and young idealists who went to Africa for work or adventure and unexpectedly found themselves witnesses to a holocaust. Adam Hochschild brings this largely untold story alive with the wit and skill of a Barbara Tuchman. Like her, he knows that history often provides a far richer cast of characters than any novelist could invent. Chief among them is Edmund Morel, a young British shipping agent who went on to lead the international crusade against Leopold. Another hero of this tale, the Irish patriot Roger Casement, ended his life on a London gallows. Two courageous black Americans, George Washington Williams and William Sheppard, risked much to bring evidence of the Congo atrocities to the outside world. Sailing into the middle of the story was a young Congo River steamboat officer named Joseph Conrad. And looming above them all, the duplicitous billionaire King Leopold II. With great power and compassion, King Leopold's Ghost will brand the tragedy of the Congo—too long forgotten—onto the conscience of the West.
Empire of Sentiment
Author: Joanna Lewis
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108195997
Pages:
Year: 2018-01-18
View: 531
Read: 1308
This is the first emotional history of the British Empire. Joanna Lewis explores how David Livingstone's death tied together British imperialism and Victorian humanitarianism and inserted it into popular culture. Sacrifice and death; Superman like heroism; the devotion of Africans; the cruelty of Arab slavery; and the sufferings of the 'ordinary man', generated waves of sentimental feeling. These powerful myths, images and feelings incubated down the generations - through grand ceremonies, further exploration, humanitarianism, Christian teaching, narratives of masculine endeavour and heroic biography - inspiring colonial rule in Africa, white settler pioneers, missionaries and Africans. Empire of Sentiment demonstrates how this central African story shaped Britain's romantic perception of itself as a humane power overseas when the colonial reality fell far short. Through sentimental humanitarianism, Livingstone helped sustain a British Empire in Africa that remained profoundly Victorian, polyphonic and ideological; whilst always understood at home as proudly liberal on race.
The Cult of Rhodes
Author: Paul Maylam
Publisher: New Africa Books
ISBN: 0864866844
Pages: 184
Year: 2005
View: 938
Read: 480
Why a cult should have developed around Rhodes, who, to all accounts, was far from admirable a person is the subject of this book. The author is ironical and critical as he sets out to address the paradox of why such an unappealing and 'rather mediocre person' should have been so explored in this context, including the imprint of Rhodes' ecological imperialism on the natural environment, the debunking of Rhodes after World War II, the surprising silence from Afrikaners and Africans in critical studies of Rhodes, and the (rather strange) link-up between the Rhodes Trust and the Mandela Foundation. Rhodes' memory, meanwhile, has been deliberately, sometimes violently, erased in the country once named after him, where his grave still remains in close proximity with that of the great Ndebele king Mzilikazi.
How Europe Underdeveloped Africa
Author:
Publisher: East African Publishers
ISBN: 9966251138
Pages:
Year:
View: 962
Read: 522

The Scramble for Africa, 1876-1912
Author: Thomas Pakenham
Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson
ISBN: 0297819941
Pages: 738
Year: 1997
View: 474
Read: 786

Heroes of Empire
Author: Edward Berenson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520234278
Pages: 360
Year: 2011
View: 317
Read: 950
Examines, through the lives of five important English and French figures, the history of the exploration and colonization of Africa between 1870 and 1914, and the role the mass media played in promoting colonial conquest.
How Europe Underdeveloped Africa
Author: Walter Rodney
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1788731204
Pages: 416
Year: 2018-11-27
View: 1034
Read: 1123
The classic work of political, economic, and historical analysis, powerfully introduced by Angela Davis In his short life, the Guyanese intellectual Walter Rodney emerged as one of the leading thinkers and activists of the anticolonial revolution, leading movements in North America, South America, the African continent, and the Caribbean. In each locale, Rodney found himself a lightning rod for working class Black Power. His deportation catalyzed 20th century Jamaica's most significant rebellion, the 1968 Rodney riots, and his scholarship trained a generation how to think politics at an international scale. In 1980, shortly after founding of the Working People's Alliance in Guyana, the 38-year-old Rodney would be assassinated. In his magnum opus, How Europe Underdeveloped Africa, Rodney incisively argues that grasping "the great divergence" between the west and the rest can only be explained as the exploitation of the latter by the former. This meticulously researched analysis of the abiding repercussions of European colonialism on the continent of Africa has not only informed decades of scholarship and activism, it remains an indispensable study for grasping global inequality today.
Hero of the Empire
Author: Candice Millard
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 0307948781
Pages: 416
Year: 2017
View: 526
Read: 1201
A thrilling narrative of Winston Churchill's extraordinary and little-known exploits during the Boer War. Churchill arrived in South Africa in 1899, valet and crates of vintage wine in tow, there to cover the brutal colonial war the British were fighting with Boer rebels. But just two weeks after his arrival Churchill was taken prisoner ... The story of his escape is incredible enough, but then Churchill enlisted, returned to South Africa, fought in several battles, and ultimately liberated the men with whom he had been imprisoned. Hero of Empire is more than an adventure story, for the lessons Churchill took from the Boer War would profoundly affect twentieth-century history.
China's Second Continent
Author: Howard W. French
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307946657
Pages: 285
Year: 2014
View: 478
Read: 1298
Documents the burgeoning Chinese presence in Africa to examine China's potentially world-changing role in reshaping Africa's culture and economy.
Where the Negroes Are Masters
Author: Randy J. Sparks
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674726472
Pages: 321
Year: 2014-01-13
View: 711
Read: 651
Annamaboe--largest slave trading port on the Gold Coast--was home to wily African merchants whose partnerships with Europeans made the town an integral part of Atlantic webs of exchange. Randy Sparks recreates the outpost's feverish bustle and brutality, tracing the entrepreneurs, black and white, who thrived on a lucrative traffic in human beings.
Histories of the Hanged: The Dirty War in Kenya and the End of Empire
Author: David Anderson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393079740
Pages: 448
Year: 2011-02-07
View: 555
Read: 158
"A remarkable account of Britain's last stand in Kenya. This is imperial history at its very best."--John Hope Franklin In "a gripping narrative that is all but impossible to put down" (Joseph C. Miller), Histories of the Hanged exposes the long-hidden colonial crimes of the British in Kenya. This groundbreaking work tells how the brutal war between the colonial government and the insurrectionist Mau Mau between 1952 and 1960 dominated the final bloody decade of imperialism in East Africa. Using extraordinary new evidence, David Anderson puts the colonial government on trial with eyewitness testimony from over 800 court cases and previously unseen archives. His research exonerates the Kikuyu rebels; hardly the terrorists they were thought to be; and reveals the British to be brutal aggressors in a "dirty war" that involved leaders at the highest ranks of the British government. This astonishing piece of scholarship portrays a teetering colonial empire in its final phase; employing whatever military and propaganda methods it could to preserve an order that could no longer hold.
Diamonds, Gold and War
Author: Martin Meredith
Publisher: Gardners Books
ISBN: 1416526374
Pages: 570
Year: 2008
View: 1105
Read: 420
The prize was great -- not just land, but the riches it held, in the form of diamonds and gold. What became a country called South Africa was, until 1910, a vast and untamed land where great fortunes could be made (and lost); where great battles were fought (and lost); and where great men had their reputations forged, or dashed, or sometimes both. Martin Meredith's follow-up to his magisterial The State of Africa is an equally epic new history of the making of South Africa. Covering the extraordinarily eventful four decades leading up to the establishment of the Union of South Africa in 1910, it covers some of the most iconic tales of imperial history. The Zulus at Rorke's Drift; the Jameson Raid; the diamond and gold rushes at Kimberley and Witwatersrand; the Boer wars; the titanic struggle between the arch-imperialist Cecil Rhodes and his Boer rival, Paul Kruger -- DIAMONDS, GOLD AND WAR brings all of these and more together in a stunningly coherent and compelling narrative. History, somehow, just isn't as colourful any more.
Selling the Congo
Author: Matthew G. Stanard
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803239882
Pages: 408
Year: 2012-01-01
View: 1316
Read: 868
Belgium was a small, neutral country without a colonial tradition when King Leopold II ceded the Congo, his personal property, to the state in 1908. For the next half century Belgium not only ruled an African empire but also, through widespread, enduring, and eagerly embraced propaganda, produced an imperialist-minded citizenry. Selling the Congo is a study of European pro-empire propaganda in Belgium, with particular emphasis on the period 1908–60. Matthew G. Stanard questions the nature of Belgian imperialism in the Congo and considers the Belgian case in light of literature on the French, British, and other European overseas empires. Comparing Belgium to other imperial powers, the book finds that pro-empire propaganda was a basic part of European overseas expansion and administration during the modern period. Arguing against the long-held belief that Belgians were merely “reluctant imperialists,” Stanard demonstrates that in fact many Belgians readily embraced imperialistic propaganda. Selling the Congo contributes to our understanding of the effectiveness of twentieth-century propaganda by revealing its successes and failures in the Belgian case. Many readers familiar with more-popular histories of Belgian imperialism will find in this book a deeper examination of European involvement in central Africa during the colonial era.
Echoes of Empire
Author: Kalypso S Nicolaidis, Berny Sebe, Gabrielle Maas
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 1784530514
Pages: 496
Year: 2015-01-30
View: 262
Read: 493
How does our colonial past echo through today's global politics? How have former empire-builders sought vindication or atonement, and formerly colonized states reversal or retribution? This groundbreaking book presents a panoramic view of attitudes to empires past and present, seen not only through the hard politics of international power structures but also through the nuances of memory, historiography and national and minority cultural identities. Bringing together leading historians, political scientists and international relations scholars from across the globe, "Echoes of Empire" emphasizes Europe's colonial legacy while also highlighting the importance of non-European power centres - Ottoman, Russian, Chinese, Japanese - in shaping world politics, then and now. "Echoes of Empire" bridges the divide between disciplines to trace the global routes travelled by objects, ideas and people, and forms a radically different notion of the term 'empire' itself. This will be an essential companion to courses on international relations and imperial history as well as a fascinating read for anyone interested in Western hegemony, North-South relations, global power shifts and the longue duree in world politics.

Recently Visited