Feeding Nelsons Navy The True Story Of Food At Sea In The Georgian Era Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Feeding Nelson's Navy
Author: Janet Macdonald
Publisher: Frontline Books
ISBN: 147383516X
Pages: 224
Year: 2014-04-30
View: 267
Read: 333
This celebration of the Georgian sailor's diet reveals how the navy's administrators fed a fleet of more than 150,000 men, in ships that were often at sea for months on end and that had no recourse to either refrigeration or canning. Contrary to the prevailing image of rotten meat and weevily biscuits their diet was a surprisingly hearty mixture of beer, brandy, salt beef and pork, pease, butter, cheese, hard biscuit and the exotic sounding lobscouse, not to mention the Malaga raisins, oranges, lemons, figs, dates and pumpkins which were available to ships on far-distant stations. In fact, by 1800 the British fleet had largely eradicated scurvy and other dietary disorders. ??While this scholarly work contains much of value to the historian, the author's popular touch makes this an enthralling story for anyone with an interest in life at sea in the age of sail.
Heart of Oak
Author: James P. McGuane
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393047490
Pages: 191
Year: 2002
View: 377
Read: 1308
A photographic essay of the world depicted in Patrick O'Brian's Napoleonic era novels features images of museum artifacts culled from shipwrecked vessels to present a perspective of the everyday lives of sailors and officers in the Royal Navy. 10,000 first printing.
Female Tars
Author: Suzanne J. Stark
Publisher: Naval Institute Press
ISBN: 1682472698
Pages: 224
Year: 2017-09-15
View: 1122
Read: 1032
The wives and female guests of commissioned officers often went to sea in the sailing ships of the British Royal Navy in the 18th and 19th centuries, but there were other women on board as well, rarely mentioned in print. Suzanne Stark has written the story of the women who lived on the lower decks. She thoroughly investigates the custom of allowing prostitutes to live with the crews of warships in port. She provides some judicious answers to questions about what led so many women to such an appalling fate and why the Royal Navy unofficially condoned the practice. She also offers some revealing firsthand accounts of the wives of warrant officers and semen who spent years at sea living—and fighting—beside their men without pay or even food rations, and of the women in male disguise who actually served as seamen or marines. These women’s stories have long intrigued the public as the popularity of the often richly embellished accounts of their exploits has proved. Stark disentangles fact from myth and offers some well-founded explanations for such perplexing phenomena as the willingness of women to join the navy when most of the men had to be forced on board by press gangs. Now available in paperback, this lively history draws on primary sources and so gives an authentic view of life on board the ships of Britain’s old sailing navy and the social context of the period that served to limit roles open to lower-class women. The final chapter is devoted to the autobiography of one redoubtable seagoing woman: Mary Lacy, who served as a seaman in shipwright in the Royal Navy for twelve years.
Men-of-War: Life in Nelson's Navy
Author: Patrick O'Brian
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393038580
Pages: 95
Year: 1974
View: 1257
Read: 1307
The author of the acclaimed Aubrey/Maturin historical sea novels presents a concise, profusely illustrated description of daily life in Nelson's navy, including anecdotes about the battles and commanders that established Britain's naval supremacy.
The War for All the Oceans
Author: Roy Adkins, Lesley Adkins
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1440638624
Pages: 560
Year: 2008-07-29
View: 375
Read: 1210
As he did with his much lauded Nelson?s Trafalgar, Roy Adkins (now writing with wife Lesley) again thrusts readers into the perils and thrills of early-nineteenth-century warfare. From its very first page, this is an adventure story?a superb account of the naval war that lasted from Napoleon?s seizure of power in 1798 to the War of 1812 with the United States. Providing a ringside seat to the decisive battles, as well as detailed and vivid portraits of sailors and commanders, press-gangs, prostitutes, and spies, The War for All the Oceans is ?a rollicking, patriotic account of the Napoleonic wars that will go down well with Master and Commander fans? (The Telegraph).
Nutrition in Institutions
Author: Maria Cross, Barbara MacDonald
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444301675
Pages: 440
Year: 2009-01-26
View: 641
Read: 1023
The importance of good nutrition for individual health and well-being is widely recognized, yet for a significant number of people who rely on institutions for food and nutrition, this importance has not always been a primary consideration. People, therefore, may find themselves consuming food they would not ordinarily choose to eat, with, in some cases, restricted choices precluding individual preferences and compromising health. In recent years, there have been major advances in the quality of catering in some areas, particularly schools. Other institutions which have not been thrust into the media spotlight have fared less well in terms of policy drive and commitment. This insightful new book looks in detail at five institutions: schools, hospitals, care homes for the elderly, prisons and the armed forces. As well as providing a fascinating history of the provision of food in each institution, each section considers: current policy and standards and their implementation adequacy of food provided with regard to the health status and dietary requirements of the people in the care of each institution efficiency of catering organization and issues relating to contract tendering, expenditure and procurement A broad spectrum of further relevant issues is also covered, including the meaning of food to those in institutions and determinants of choice.
In These Times
Author: Jenny Uglow
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1466828226
Pages: 752
Year: 2015-01-27
View: 343
Read: 751
A beautifully observed history of the British home front during the Napoleonic Wars by a celebrated historian We know the thrilling, terrible stories of the battles of the Napoleonic Wars—but what of those left behind? The people on a Norfolk farm, in a Yorkshire mill, a Welsh iron foundry, an Irish village, a London bank, a Scottish mountain? The aristocrats and paupers, old and young, butchers and bakers and candlestick makers—how did the war touch their lives? Jenny Uglow, the prizewinning author of The Lunar Men and Nature's Engraver, follows the gripping back-and-forth of the first global war but turns the news upside down, seeing how it reached the people. Illustrated by the satires of Gillray and Rowlandson and the paintings of Turner and Constable, and combining the familiar voices of Austen, Wordsworth, Scott, and Byron with others lost in the crowd, In These Times delves into the archives to tell the moving story of how people lived and loved and sang and wrote, struggling through hard times and opening new horizons that would change their country for a century.
Counter-attack
Author: Siegfried Sassoon
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 64
Year: 1918
View: 1315
Read: 953

In Nelson's Wake
Author: James Davey
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300217323
Pages: 440
Year: 2016-03-17
View: 879
Read: 1300
Horatio Nelson’s celebrated victory over the French at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 presented Britain with an unprecedented command of the seas. Yet the Royal Navy’s role in the struggle against Napoleonic France was far from over. This groundbreaking book asserts that, contrary to the accepted notion that the Battle of Trafalgar essentially completed the Navy’s task, the war at sea actually intensified over the next decade, ceasing only with Napoleon’s final surrender. In this dramatic account of naval contributions between 1803 and 1815, James Davey offers original and exciting insights into the Napoleonic wars and Britain’s maritime history. Encompassing Trafalgar, the Peninsular War, the War of 1812, the final campaign against Napoleon, and many lesser known but likewise crucial moments, the book sheds light on the experiences of individuals high and low, from admiral and captain to sailor and cabin boy. The cast of characters also includes others from across Britain—dockyard workers, politicians, civilians—who made fundamental contributions to the war effort, and in so doing, both saved the nation and shaped Britain’s history.
The British Navy's Victualling Board, 1793-1815
Author: Janet W. Macdonald
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
ISBN: 1843835533
Pages: 264
Year: 2010
View: 1279
Read: 919
An examination of the Royal Navy's Victualling Board, the body responsible for supplying the fleet.
Political Gastronomy
Author: Michael A. LaCombe
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812207157
Pages: 240
Year: 2012-07-24
View: 479
Read: 905
"The table constitutes a kind of tie between the bargainer and the bargained-with, and makes the diners more willing to receive certain impressions, to submit to certain influences: from this is born political gastronomy. Meals have become a means of governing, and the fate of whole peoples is decided at a banquet."—Jean Anthèlme Brillat-Savarin, The Physiology of Taste, or, Meditations on Transcendental Gastronomy The first Thanksgiving at Plymouth in 1621 was a powerfully symbolic event and not merely the pageant of abundance that we still reenact today. In these early encounters between Indians and English in North America, food was also symbolic of power: the venison brought to Plymouth by the Indians, for example, was resonant of both masculine skill with weapons and the status of the men who offered it. These meanings were clearly understood by Plymouth's leaders, however weak they appeared in comparison. Political Gastronomy examines the meaning of food in its many facets: planting, gathering, hunting, cooking, shared meals, and the daily labor that sustained ordinary households. Public occasions such as the first Thanksgiving could be used to reinforce claims to status and precedence, but even seemingly trivial gestures could dramatize the tense negotiations of status and authority: an offer of roast squirrel or a spoonful of beer, a guest's refusal to accept his place at the table, the presence and type of utensils, whether hands should be washed or napkins used. Historian Michael A. LaCombe places Anglo-Indian encounters at the center of his study, and his wide-ranging research shows that despite their many differences in language, culture, and beliefs, English settlers and American Indians were able to communicate reciprocally in the symbolic language of food.
Broadmoor Revealed
Author: Mark Stevens
Publisher: Seaforth
ISBN: 1781593205
Pages: 180
Year: 2013
View: 1228
Read: 386
The five volumes that constitute Arthur Marder's From the Dreadnought to Scapa Flow represented arguably the finest contribution to the literature of naval history since Alfred Mahan. A J P Taylor wrote that 'his naval history has a unique fascination. To unrivalled mastery of sources he adds a gift of simple narrative . . . He is beyond praise, as he is beyond cavil.' The five volumes were subtitled The Royal Navy in the Fisher Era, 1904–1919 and they are still, despite recent major contributions from Robert Massie and Andrew Gordan, regarded by many as the definitive history of naval events leading up to and including the Great War. This first volume covers many facets of the history of the Royal Navy during the pre-war decade, including the economic and political background such as the 1906 Liberal Government hostility towards naval spending. Inevitably, however, attention moves to the German naval challenge, the arms race and the subsequent Anglo-German rivalry, and, finally, the British plans for the blockade of the German High Seas Fleet. A new introduction by Barry Gough, the distinguished Canadian maritime and naval historian, assesses the importance of Marder's work and anchors it firmly amongst the great naval narrative histories of this era. This new paperback edition will bring a truly great work to a new generation of historians and general readers.
The Wooden World
Author: N. A. M. Rodger
Publisher: W. W. Norton
ISBN: 0393314693
Pages: 445
Year: 1986
View: 732
Read: 768
From the award-winning naval scholar N. A. M. Rodger comes the most revealing account yet of the mighty Georgian navy and British naval society of the eighteenth century.
Accidental Medical Discoveries
Author: Robert W. Winters
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 151071247X
Pages: 288
Year: 2016-11-22
View: 369
Read: 1302
Many of the world’s most important and life-saving devices and techniques were often discovered purely by accident. Serendipity, timing, and luck played a part in the discovery of unintentional cures and breakthroughs: A plastic shard in an RAF pilot’s eye leads to the use of plastic for contact lenses. The inability to remove a titanium chamber from rabbit’s bone leads to dental implants. Viagra was discovered by a group of chemists, working in the lab to find a new drug to alleviate the pain of angina pectoris. A stretch of five weeks of unusually warm weather in 1928 played a role in assisting Dr. Alexander Fleming in his analysis of bacterial growth and the discovery of penicillin. After studying the effects of the venom injected by the bite of a deadly pit viper snake, chemists developed a groundbreaking drug that works to control blood pressure. Accidental Medical Discoveries is an entertaining and enlightening look at the creation of 25 medical inventions that have changed the world – unintentionally. The book is presented in a lively and engaging way, and will appeal to a wide variety of readers, from history buffs to trivia fanatics to those in the medical profession.
Dark Days of Georgian Britain
Author: James Hobson
Publisher: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 1526702568
Pages: 224
Year: 2017-10-30
View: 393
Read: 611
In Dark Days of Georgian Britain, James Hobson challenges the long established view of high society during the Regency, and instead details an account of a society in change. Often upheld as a period of elegance with many achievements in the fine arts and architecture, the Regency era also encompassed a time of great social, political and economic upheaval. In this insightful social history the emphasis is on the life of the every-man, on the lives of the poor and the challenges they faced. Using a wide range of sources, Hobson shares the stories of real people. He explores corruption in government and elections; "bread or blood" rioting, the political discontent felt and the revolutionaries involved. He explores attitudes to adultery and marriage, and the moral panic about homosexuality. Grave robbery is exposed, along with the sharp pinch of food scarcity, prison and punishment. It is not a gentle portrayal akin to Jane Austen's England, this is a society where the popular hatred of the Prince Regent was widespread and where laws and new capitalist attitudes oppressed the poor. With Hobson's illustrative account, it is time to rethink the Regency.

Recently Visited